Trekking Archives

The Peddars Way & Norfolk Coast Path- Preparation

Peddars WaySo the decision was made… in July 2012 I was going to walk the Peddars Way and Norfolk Coast Path long distance trails– a total distance of 96 miles.

The Peddars Way follows the line of an ancient Roman road and runs from Knettishall Heath through the flat agricultural landscape of Norfolk, ending at the coast at Holme-next-the-Sea. By contrast, the Norfolk Coast Path (Henceforth to be known as NCP to save me valuable minutes of typing time… I am not an endurance typist!) is a newly created path and runs from Hunstanton to Cromer, hugging the sandy beaches, jagged cliffs and salt marshes of the Norfolk Coast. As the two paths meet at Holme-next-the-sea, they are usually walked together. Read about the Peddars Way and NCP in a little more detail in this post.

Why I Chose to Walk the Peddars Way and NCP

Read the rest of this entry

Peddars Way and Norfolk Coast PathThe Peddars Way and Norfolk Coast Path National Trail form a 93 mile trail across Norfolk and around the Norfolk coast. The Peddars Way runs for 47 miles from Knettishall Health in Suffolk to Holme-Next-The-Sea on the Norfolk Coast, carving like a knife through the remote agricultural lands of north east Norfolk as it marches inexorably towards the sea.

The Way was one of the earliest known Roman roads to be built in Norfolk. It formed part of an extensive network of routes created following the failed revolt of the Celtic leader Boudicca, allowing the Roman army fast access to the coast as well as all areas of Britain in case of further Celtic uprisings.

Over the centuries the Peddars Way has changed from a symbol of Roman might and oppression to an important trade route for pilgrims and drovers. In fact the name ‘Peddars Way’ did not come into common use until medieval times. Most of the route of the Peddars Way can still be traced today, and in some places the raised ‘agger’ of the original Roman Road can still be seen.

As the Peddars Way joins up with the Norfolk Coast Path at Holme-Next-The-Sea, the two trails have been linked and are usually walked together.

Read the rest of this entry

Chasing the Naranjo de Bulnes, Picos de Europa

Naranjo de BulnesThe Naranjo de Bulnes, literally the ‘Orange of Bulnes’, had acquired a somewhat legendary status amongst our trekking group. It’s Asturian name is Picu Urriello, and it is one of the best known sights of the Picos de Europa mountain range in Northern Spain– a huge monolith of limestone rock, towering over the tiny isolated mountain village of Bulnes.

There are many view points from which to appreciate it, but thanks to several days of rain and low cloud, we hadn’t yet had so much of a glimpse. But that was to change today, or so we hoped…

The day had started off clear and sunny, so we bundled our packs into our tour leader, Juan’s, four wheel drive and started climbing the rough zig zag path to the Pandebano Col, which was to be the starting point for our quest. Abandoning the car, we leapt out and walked uphill through green meadows, noticing with some consternation that the cloud had already started to hide the tops of the mountains surrounding us, begrudgingly allowing the sun to shine through from time to time to spotlight the valley far below.

Read the rest of this entry

Walking the Cares Gorge- Picos de Europa

Cares GorgeThe spectacular Cares Gorge was created by glacial waters carving a deep ravine separating the Western and Eastern massifs of the Picos de Europa mountains in northern Spain. The sparking waters of the river Cares now rush and bustle their way along the bottom of the gorge, but in 1916 it was decided to divert some of the water along a canal blasted out of the cliff face to feed the hydro-electricity station at Poncebos. An access path was created at the same time, and although originally intended to service the canal it has become a hugely popular walk.

Read the rest of this entry

The Telegraph Adventure Travel Show, Olympia

Ben Fogle speaking at the Adventure Travel ShowAfter years of intending to go to the Telegraph Adventure Travel Show, I finally decided I should just stop talking about it and take the not exactly arduous step of booking the ticket and catching the coach down to London… which I ended up changing as Ben Fogle was originally scheduled to talk on Saturday but two weeks before the event I noticed that this had been rescheduled for Sunday!

So my first tip would be to keep checking the schedules if there’s a particular speaker you really want to see- there’s nothing more annoying than travelling down only to find that they are now speaking the next day! Although the web site does warn that the talks are subject to change so it is up to you to check…

Read the rest of this entry

I’m Going to the Adventure Travel Show!

I’m so excited… I am going to the Adventure Travel Show in London tomorrow!! It’s held around the last weekend of January at Olympia in London, and I have wanted to go for years- so this year I thought I’d put my money where my mouth is and go!

There will be loads of adventure tour companies, trekking companies, equipment suppliers etc exhibiting there and I expect my bucket list will grow considerably… there are also free talks held throughout the weekend. I originally booked my coach ticket for today, but changed it to tomorrow as Ben Fogle and James Cracknell are talking tomorrow- they have both done some truly epic endurance challenges and I can’t wait to hear about them. Plus have a little hero worship of course…

I’m so excited!!

Happy Shiny New 2013!!!

Endurance AdventuresI love the start of a New Year. Although change can happen at any time in your life, there’s something special about January 1st that marks the threshold of a new chapter in your life- a feeling of starting again and making real progress in the 12 months now ahead of you…

So- have you got your endurance adventures planned out for 2013? What races will you do, what challenge events will you complete, what ultras will see you sweating through all manner of terrain, what personal challenges will you meet?

Read the rest of this entry

Should You Trek Alone or Use a Travel Company?

I was following a debate online the other day on whether it is best to organise your own trek or go on an organised walking tour with an established travel company. Some people seemed entrenched in one camp, but for me there are pros and cons for each. Here are my thoughts;

Read the rest of this entry

 Page 4 of 4 « 1  2  3  4